Sharing Your Best Work With Other Teachers

  • Copies of your lesson plans
  • Your reflections on teaching, learning, and/or assessment
  • Examples of your students’ work

1. CREATE A TED-ED LESSON

One of the best ways for teachers to share a lesson is to create a TED-Ed lesson. These three- to five-minute animated videos focus on topics ranging from chemistry to Shakespeare to origami. Each animation is created by a classroom teacher in collaboration with a TED-Ed scriptwriter, professional animator, and voice-over actor.

2. POST A VIDEO TO THE TEACHING CHANNEL

Teachers willing to post to the internet a high-quality video of themselves engaged in the act of teaching can do so via Teaching Channel. Launched in 2011, this nonprofit aims to “revolutionize the profession by providing free lesson sharing.” As an example of the kinds of material you can find here, one of the more popular teachers on Teaching Channel is high school English teacher Sarah Brown Wessling.

3. UPLOAD A LESSON PLAN TO THE INTERNET

If you’re a teacher with a great lesson plan and are willing to share it freely, consider uploading it to Share My Lesson, the Yelp of teacher lesson plans. Here, teachers can find lesson plans produced by other teachers and also also leave feedback. If you have questions about uploading lesson plans and becoming a contributor, send a message to content@sharemylesson.com.

4. START A BLOG — OR CONTRIBUTE TO SOMEONE ELSE’S

Over the years, I’ve read many teacher-produced blogs — one of my favorites is produced by middle school English teacher Laura Bradley. I’m also a big fan of the blogs that appear in “The 2017 Honor Roll: EdTech’s Must-Read K–12 IT Blogs.”

5. HOST A PODCAST — OR CONTRIBUTE TO SOMEONE ELSE’S

Here are some of the more popular teacher-produced podcasts:

6. HOST A WEBINAR — OR CONTRIBUTE TO SOMEONE ELSE’S

A webinar — short for Web-based seminar — is a presentation, sometimes interactive, that’s available over the internet. Subscribers have the opportunity to join from their home but still ask questions and engage with the presenter; you can also watch a non-interactive archived version of a webinar after it’s over.

7. POST TO TWITTER

Twitter is an excellent place for teachers to consume and learn. Therefore, if you’re a teacher and have something to share with other teachers, I suggest you tweet. I especially suggest that teachers use Twitter to showcase their students’ work. Doing so will increase student engagement, as described in an article I wrote recently for KQED’s In the Classroom.

8. SERVE REMOTELY ON A TEACHER ADVISORY COMMITTEE

It seems everybody today wants input from a teacher. If you’re a teacher and have something of value to offer the world of education, consider serving remotely on a teacher advisory committee. The process is usually as simple as finding a committee that you’d like to serve on and emailing one or more committee members to express interest. It usually doesn’t take more than that, though in some cases a formal application is required.

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Peter Paccone

Peter Paccone

High school APUSH teacher with much in-class and online teaching experience. Also a blogger, keynote speaker, editor, podcast host, and conference presenter.