The APUSH Student-Produced Historical Fiction Letter

STEP #1

  • Was John Brown a hero or a villain?
  • Should anyone ever be put to death (aka executed) for having engaged in criminal behavior?
  • What was the better position to take in 1859? The position of the abolitionist or the free soiler?
  • What was it like to serve on the Charles W. Morgan?
  • All innocent of both murder and manslaughter
  • One or more guilty of murder; others innocent
  • One of more guilty of manslaughter; others innocent
  • One or more guilty of murder; one or more guilty of manslaughter; others innocent
  1. Treat tribes as conquered peoples who have forfeited any claims to land.
  • Tribes abolished and people left to survive on their own.
  • Native Americans subject to state and federal laws.
  • U. S. citizenship possible in the future.
  • Tribes remain and control tribal land.
  • Native Americans subject to tribal government laws that are not in conflict with U.S. laws.
  • U. S. citizenship denied.
  • Tribes gradually disappear as some members sell their land and most become assimilated into American society
  • Native Americans subject to state and federal laws
  • U. S. citizenship possible in future.
  • Tribes occupy and control their reservation land.
  • Native Americans subject to tribal government and federal laws.
  • U. S. citizenship possible in future.
  • Tribes occupy sections of the state, but elect a state government.
  • Native Americans subject to state and federal laws.
  • U. S. citizenship immediate.
  • Tribes have supreme authority within their national boundaries.
  • Native Americans subject only to tribal laws.
  • U.S. citizenship not possible.

STEP #2

STEP #3

CONCLUSION

  • Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization and analysis of relevant content.
  • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
  • Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies

  • Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reExplain how information and experiences may be interpreted by people from diverse cultural perspectives and frames of reference.
  • Analyze and explain the ways groups, societies, and cultures address human needs and concerns

How to Write Fiction 2015 TED-Ed Lesson

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High school APUSH teacher with much in-class and online teaching experience. Also a blogger, keynote speaker, editor, podcast host, and conference presenter.

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Peter Paccone

Peter Paccone

High school APUSH teacher with much in-class and online teaching experience. Also a blogger, keynote speaker, editor, podcast host, and conference presenter.

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